The filters below can help refine your search. You can use them to select which Step(s) of the Natural Capital Protocol you are working on, which impact drivers and dependencies you're interested in, your geographical scope and more. Please note that the list of filters on the left use the AND function.

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Impact driversA measurable quantity of a natural resource that is used as an input to production or a measurable non-product output of business activity

  • E.g., the volume of groundwater consumed, the volume of surface water consumed, etc.
  • E.g., volume of waste by classification (hazardous, non-hazardous, radioactive…), by material constituents (lead, plastic…), or by disposal method (landfill, incineration, recycling…).
  • E.g., volume of waste matter discharges and retained in soil over a given period.
  • E.g., decibels and duration of noise, lumens and duration of light etc. at site of impact.
  • E.g., area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type, area of open cast mine by type, etc.
  • E.g., wetlands, ponds, lakes, streams, rivers or peatland necessary to provide ecosystem services. Could measure of areas of infrastructure necessary for use, such as bridges, dams etc.
  • E.g., area of aquaculture by type, area of seabed mining by type, etc.
  • E.g., volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild caught fish by species, number of wild-caught mammals by species, etc.
  • E.g., volume discharged to receiving water body of nutrients, (e.g. nitrates and phosphates) or other substances (e.g. heavy metals or chemicals).
  • E.g., volume of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, HFCs, and PFCs, etc.
  • E.g., volume of PM2.5, PM10, VOCs, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, etc.
  • E.g., impact on species, ecosystems, habitats or genetic diversity.

DependenciesA business reliance on or use of natural capital

  • E.g., solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel.
  • E.g., wood fiber, genetic resources, metals, minerals, plant and animal materials.
  • E.g., human or animal food.
  • E.g., Fresh water (ground, surface or rain) or sea water.
  • E.g., flood attenuation, water quality regulation.
  • E.g., employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions that support company staff or operations.
  • E.g., crop pest control, pollination.
  • E.g., waste assimilation, noise and dust regulation.
  • E.g., nature based recreation, tourism.
  • E.g., information from nature (such as for bio-mimicry).
  • A business dependence on biodiversity may materialize through some of the other dependencies above. Tick this box if you are interested in biodiversity specifically.

Geographical scope

Sectoral scope

Type of tool

Valuation type The process of estimating the relative importance, worth, or usefulness of natural capital to people or to a business, in a particular context

Organizational focus The part or parts of the business to be assessed e.g., the company as a whole, a business unit, or a product, project, process, site, or incident

  • Assessment of a corporation or group, including all subsidiaries, business units, divisions, different geographies or markets, etc.
  • Assessment of a planned undertaking or initiative for a specific purpose. NOTE thisincludes assessments of sites, activities, processes, and incidents.
  • Assessment of particular goods and/or services, including the materials and services used to produce these products

Value chain boundary The part or parts of the business value chain to be included in a natural capital assessment

  • or cradle-to-gate: covers the activities of suppliers, including purchased energy
  • or gate-to-gate: covers activities over which the business has direct operational control Including majority-owned subsidiaries.
  • or gate-to-grave: covers activities linked to the purchase, use, reuse, recovery, recycling, and final disposal of the business’ products and services

Intended user

Cost to access

Data needs

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57 Results sorting by
Tool name Developer(s)
Impact drivers
Dependencies
Natural Capital Quick Scan CREM and Royal HaskoningDHV were responsible for the content; Except Integrated Sustainability and NXTE for strategy respectively software development

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Materials

"The Natural Capital Quick Scan offers: (i) insight in your potential impacts and dependencies; (ii) ease of use through key questions, predefined answers and results; and (iii) inspiration and support for informed decision making. The tool is promoted by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Confederation of Netherlands Industry and Employers (known as VNO-NCW, the largest employers' organisation in the Netherlands)."

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Materials
One Planet Thinking protocol on biodiversity The method is Arcadis, commissioned by Eneco, in cooperation with WWF

Impact drivers

  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

The One Planet Thinking protocol on biodiversity addresses first steps of the development of a method or protocol for applying the planetary boundaries concept to business pressures on biodiversity. Despite the inherent complexity of measuring biodiversity impacts, and the challenge to scale down and operationalize the planetary boundaries concept, applying planetary boundaries concepts to business’ biodiversity impacts is feasibly demonstrated. The challenge of measuring biodiversity impacts for individual companies, the need to assess these at regional or local scales, and how planetary boundaries can be identified at local or regional scales, are all described in a step-by-step process. The methodological framework is applied on main drivers for biodiversity loss, and includes preliminary steps to develop an OPT protocol on biodiversity for GHG emissions. The protocol might be later expanded for other important drivers of biodiversity loss, e.g. direct land intake and fragmentation.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 05, 06

Impact drivers

  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

OPAL (Offset Portfolio Analyzer and Locator) Natural Capital Project

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation

"OPAL makes the consequences of development more transparent and enables design of mitigation portfolios in a way that maintains or restores environmental benefits in a more socially equitable manner. OPAL is designed to support project-level environmental impact assessment and mitigation decisions, accounting for both impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and to ecosystem services. With OPAL, users can estimate the impacts of development activities, such as mines or roads, on terrestrial ecosystems and on a subset of the services they provide, and then efficiently select offsets to mitigate losses. OPAL then tracks how the environmental impacts of development and mitigation activities affect people through their effects on ES provision. In this way, OPAL makes the consequences of development more transparent and enables design of mitigation portfolios in a way that maintains or restores environmental benefits in a more socially equitable manner."

Applies to Step 04, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
Protected Area Benefit Assessment Tool (PA-BAT) WWF and Equilibrium Research

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity

The Protected Areas Benefits Assessment Tool (PA-BAT) has been developed to help collate information on the full range of values from protected areas and the current and potential benefits (both economic and intrinsic) of individual protected areas from ecosystem services using a participatory approach.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
Resource Investment Optimization System (RIOS) Natural Capital Project

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water

The Resource Investment Optimization System (RIOS) supports the design of cost-effective investments in watershed services, providing a standardized, science-based approach to watershed management in contexts throughout the world. It combines biophysical, social, and economic data to help users identify the best locations for protection and restoration activities to maximize the ecological return on investment, within the bounds of what is socially and politically feasible.

Applies to Step 06, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
RSB Green House Gas Calculator RSB - Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials

Impact drivers

  • GHG emissions

Dependencies

The GHG Calculator assesses the level of reduction of GHG emissions from bio-based products such as biofuels and bioplastics against a fossil fuel baseline. The tool uses RSB's own methodology which was developed for global application by RSB members (industry, NGOs, UN organisations, universities, and farmers). The tool was designed for industry and farmers to demonstrate their level of GHG reduction for RSB certification but can be used for other applications. It is compatible with the EU Renewable Energy Directive.

Applies to Step 04, 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • GHG emissions

Dependencies

Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) U.S. Geological Survey

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity

In response to the need for incorporating quantified and spatially explicit measures of social values into ecosystem service assessments, the geographic information system (GIS) application, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES), was developed. SolVES is designed to assess, map, and quantify the perceived social values of ecosystem services. Social values, the perceived, nonmarket values the public ascribes to ecosystem services, particularly cultural services, such as aesthetics and recreation can be evaluated for various stakeholder groups. These groups are distinguishable by their attitudes and preferences regarding public uses, such as motorized recreation and logging. SolVES derives a quantitative, 10-point, social-values metric, the “value index”, from a combination of spatial and nonspatial responses to public value and preference surveys and calculates metrics characterizing the underlying environment, such as average distance to water and dominant landcover.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 07

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
Solvay Sustainable Portfolio Management (SPM) tool Solvay, Arthur D.Little and TNO

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Materials

At Solvay, we have designed the "SPM", Sustainable Portfolio Management, a key decision-making tool to help managers integrate sustainability in their strategies. The Sustainable Portfolio Management (SPM) is a fact-based and robust compass to steer Solvay’s portfolio toward better business because it is more sustainable. The SPM gives a dynamic vision of products' sustainability risks and opportunities in their business environment. Decision-makers are informed of the contribution of Solvay’s products to sustainability considering both their environmental manufacturing footprint and correlated risks and opportunities and how in their applications they bring benefits or face challenges in a market perspective. It enables value to be captured in emerging eco systems and helps business to grow its portfolio by levering on opportunities and turning challenges into solutions to boost performance and deliver higher growth.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Materials
SPADES (SPatial Decisions on Ecosystem Services) eCountability

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Biodiversity

SPADES has been designed for business and local authority use for robust assessment of ecosystem services using best available data. Businesses are able to use the tool to compare layout and design options for development through spatial analysis online. Outputs are quantitative, and monetised where appropriate. Designed by eCountability with the support of six partner organisations and advice from the UK construction industry, SPADES has been tested in pilot projects in London, Liverpool, Brighton and Edinburgh. The tool currently has a European focus but will be updated and expanded for use on other continents in 2018/19.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Biodiversity
TESSA (Toolkit for Ecosystem Service Site-Based Assessment) BirdLife International, UNEP-WCMC, Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, RSPB, and TBA

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

"The Toolkit for Ecosystem Service Site-based Assessment (TESSA) is a rapid, low-cost, participatory valuation tool designed to be used by non-experts for assessing the benefits that people get from nature (ecosystem services). It was created to make ecosystem service assessment more accessible and straightforward. It aims to promote better land use planning decisions by providing guidance and methods to value ecosystem services at the site level under different management alternatives. Although initially developed for conservation practitioners, there has been increasing interest in TESSA from other sectors including consultancy, business, and governments for natural capital assessments."

Applies to Step 04, 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism