The filters below can help refine your search. You can use them to select which Step(s) of the Natural Capital Protocol you are working on, which impact drivers and dependencies you're interested in, your geographical scope and more. Please note that the list of filters on the left use the AND function.

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Impact driversA measurable quantity of a natural resource that is used as an input to production or a measurable non-product output of business activity

  • E.g., the volume of groundwater consumed, the volume of surface water consumed, etc.
  • E.g., volume of waste by classification (hazardous, non-hazardous, radioactive…), by material constituents (lead, plastic…), or by disposal method (landfill, incineration, recycling…).
  • E.g., volume of waste matter discharges and retained in soil over a given period.
  • E.g., decibels and duration of noise, lumens and duration of light etc. at site of impact.
  • E.g., area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type, area of open cast mine by type, etc.
  • E.g., wetlands, ponds, lakes, streams, rivers or peatland necessary to provide ecosystem services. Could measure of areas of infrastructure necessary for use, such as bridges, dams etc.
  • E.g., area of aquaculture by type, area of seabed mining by type, etc.
  • E.g., volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild caught fish by species, number of wild-caught mammals by species, etc.
  • E.g., volume discharged to receiving water body of nutrients, (e.g. nitrates and phosphates) or other substances (e.g. heavy metals or chemicals).
  • E.g., volume of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, HFCs, and PFCs, etc.
  • E.g., volume of PM2.5, PM10, VOCs, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, etc.
  • E.g., impact on species, ecosystems, habitats or genetic diversity.

DependenciesA business reliance on or use of natural capital

  • E.g., solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel.
  • E.g., wood fiber, genetic resources, metals, minerals, plant and animal materials.
  • E.g., human or animal food.
  • E.g., Fresh water (ground, surface or rain) or sea water.
  • E.g., flood attenuation, water quality regulation.
  • E.g., employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions that support company staff or operations.
  • E.g., crop pest control, pollination.
  • E.g., waste assimilation, noise and dust regulation.
  • E.g., nature based recreation, tourism.
  • E.g., information from nature (such as for bio-mimicry).
  • A business dependence on biodiversity may materialize through some of the other dependencies above. Tick this box if you are interested in biodiversity specifically.

Geographical scope

Sectoral scope

Type of tool

Valuation type The process of estimating the relative importance, worth, or usefulness of natural capital to people or to a business, in a particular context

Organizational focus The part or parts of the business to be assessed e.g., the company as a whole, a business unit, or a product, project, process, site, or incident

  • Assessment of a corporation or group, including all subsidiaries, business units, divisions, different geographies or markets, etc.
  • Assessment of a planned undertaking or initiative for a specific purpose. NOTE thisincludes assessments of sites, activities, processes, and incidents.
  • Assessment of particular goods and/or services, including the materials and services used to produce these products

Value chain boundary The part or parts of the business value chain to be included in a natural capital assessment

  • or cradle-to-gate: covers the activities of suppliers, including purchased energy
  • or gate-to-gate: covers activities over which the business has direct operational control Including majority-owned subsidiaries.
  • or gate-to-grave: covers activities linked to the purchase, use, reuse, recovery, recycling, and final disposal of the business’ products and services

Intended user

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Data needs

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57 Results sorting by
Tool name Developer(s)
Impact drivers
Dependencies
Guidelines for Environmental & Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) The Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) within the WBCSD

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials

The Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) has developed these guidelines to guide the preparation of an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) – replacing the previous guidelines published in 2005. The document’s main objective is to guide users through the successive stages of the ESIA process in accordance with international good practice. It offers a practical guide for both large and small-scale projects, intended for use by ESIA practitioners and project decision-makers. The guidelines are the result of a collaborative effort by members of the CSI Secretariat and executives from member companies participating in the initiative. Cement and aggregates industry operators are encouraged to use the guidance to inform the development of an ESIA – as part of the process required to secure governmental permissions for the implementation of new investments and expansions to existing operations globally.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
Guidelines on Quarry Rehabilitation The Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) within the WBCSD

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Materials

The CSI Guidelines on Quarry Rehabilitation contain a clear set of recommendations for the development and implementation of a quarry rehabilitation plan. Their main objectives are: - Supporting the process of quarry rehabilitation across member companies to improve the standard of rehabilitation projects for existing and new sites. - Ensuring that CSI members have a common understanding of the CSI KPIs on quarry rehabilitation, and that reporting against these KPIs is consistent across members. The guidelines are designed to complement, and ultimately enhance, existing successful rehabilitation practices and methodologies. It is for each company to mandate and apply the guidelines within their operations to the extent and in the manner that they consider appropriate. The guidelines are aimed primarily at CSI member companies, but it is also hoped that other industry participants will consider adopting them – thereby contributing to a wider improvement in standards.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Materials
India Water Tool Developed by businesses in India (20 companies involved through 3 phases) coordinated by WBCSD in India

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Water

India Water Tool is the first country-specific tool developed to support businesses in assessing Water risks at their sites in India, planning Water management actions and reporting on Water-related indicators of key reporting initiatives. The tool is a GIS-web application, freely available for use at www.indiawatertool.in. It is an India-customisation of WBCSD’s Global Water Tool that incorporates data from government and other institutions in India at a useful level of granularity and allows an easy analysis of the Water stress (both quantity and quality) that various user sites in India face. India Water Tool has been developed through its 3 successive versions (V3 in final stages of development) by Working Groups of companies in India coordinated by WBCSD, bringing in specialist knowledge where required, and in dialogue with the Indian government.

Applies to Step 05, 06

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Water
Integral Biodiversity Impact Assessment System: IBIS CREM, IUCN-NL, Central Luzon State University (Phillipines) and Ambio Fundación (Costa Rica)

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species
  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

"The objective of the IBIS impact assessment tool is to provide procurement officers, marketeers and those involved in (the impact of) production processes with a tool to incorporate biodiversity-aspects into their decision making process. The IBIS tool: - makes it possible to compare the biodiversity impact of different products, e.g. through a score; - indicates whether the biodiversity impact of a product is acceptable or not; - assesses the main drivers causing the biodiversity impact and, based on this information, enables improvement of the production process. The tool was developed for products collected from the wild (like forestry, fishery) and products harvested from cultivated systems (agriculture, horticulture). However, the methodology can, and has, also been used in other sectors. The methodology was developed for and promoted by the Dutch government. IBIS was used in a variety of sectors, including cocoa production, salmon production, outdoor sports and construction."

Applies to Step 04, 05, 07, 09

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species
  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT) BirdLife International, Conservation International, International Union for Conservation of Nature and United Nations Environment Programme World Cons

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Materials
  • Biodiversity

The Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT) provides key decision-makers with access to critical information on biodiversity priority sites to inform decision-making processes and address any potential biodiversity impacts. IBAT is a central database for globally recognised biodiversity information including protected areas, Key Biodiversity Areas, species and regionally important conservation areas. Datasets within IBAT are updated several times per year. Developed through a partnership of global conservation leaders including BirdLife International, Conservation International (CI), the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the vision of IBAT is that decisions affecting critical natural habitats are informed by the best scientific information and in turn decision makers will support the quest to collect and enhance the underlying datasets and maintain that scientific information. To accomplish this, the IBAT alliance is developing a set of web-based decision support systems that provide easy access to site-scale and national-level conservation priorities to inform project screening/planning for several target audiences. As of March 2017, the business model of IBAT is under review and the subscription costs are likely to change.

Applies to Step 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 09

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
InVEST Natural Capital Project

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs) is a suite of free, open-source software models to map and value the goods and services from nature that sustain and fulfill human life. InVEST enables decision-makers to assess impacts associated with management choices and future climate, to identify where investment in natural capital can enhance human development and ecosystems. InVEST was developed with decision-makers and practitioners and has been continually improved for nearly a decade. The user base spans 80+ countries with over 600 downloads per month. Version includes 22 ecosystem service models, plus “helper tools” to help locate and process input data, and understand and visualize outputs. InVEST models are spatially-explicit, using maps as information sources and producing maps as outputs. Production functions define how changes in ecosystem structure and function may affect the flow and value of ecosystem services across land- or seascapes.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
Land Use Change Improved (LUCI)-LCA Natural Capital Project and Unilever

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

The Land Use Change Improved (LUCI)-LCA method presents advances for Life Cycle Assessment that integrate spatially explicit modelling of land change and ecosystem services. LUCI-LCA applies globally available, spatial data and newly accessible tools for ecosystem services to predictive modelling of large-scale changes in agricultural systems through LCA. It substitutes key elements of life cycle inventory in the agricultural stage of an attributional LCA with outputs from predictive land-change modelling (LCM) and spatially explicit ecosystem services modelling using the InVEST software suite. See Chaplin-Kramer et al. 2017. Life Cycle Assessment Needs Spatial Predictive Modeling for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15065

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

Local Ecological Footprinting Tool (LEFT) University of Oxford

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Biodiversity

LEFT is a web-based decision support tool to help industry evaluate patterns of relative ecological value across a landscape to inform land use planning and minimize environmental impact. Users choose an area of interest from a global web-based map and receive a series of high-quality datasets using standard published algorithms to produce maps at 30m resolution of land cover class, numbers of globally threatened terrestrial vertebrate and plant species, beta-diversity of terrestrial vertebrates and plants, habitat intactness, habitat connectivity, and vegetation resilience. LEFT also generates an aggregated map of relative ecological values, a customised PDF and ZIP file of GIS data for the area requested. The tool is designed to be highly intuitive, and requires no special software or expertise: novice users can receive an informative analysis in minutes. LEFT is intended as a pre-planning tool to complements but not replace the process of detailed environmental impact assessment.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Biodiversity
MiLCA Japan Environmental Management Association for Industry

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials

MiLCA is a life cycle assessment (LCA) support system. The default database supports users to quantify an amount of water and other abiotic resources use and emissions (e.g. CO2 and SOx). These resource use and emissions can be converted to monetary value by using LIME2 method.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials
Natural Capital Assessments at the National and Sub-national Level UNEP-WCMC

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Energy e.g. solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel
  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

Natural Capital Assessments at the National and Sub-national Level presents a stepwise guidance document to conducting a natural capital assessment. The steps presented in the guide are designed around sets of key questions, together with practical checklists of actions. The assessment process set out is designed to provide an evidence base for understanding and mapping the distribution of natural capital, evaluating its status and trends, and exploring its relationship with priority economic sectors and livelihoods. In turn the information collated through the assessment process will help to inform the development of policy targets for sustainable management and improvement of natural capital and the transition to a green economy over time.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Energy e.g. solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel
  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism