The filters below can help refine your search. You can use them to select which Step(s) of the Natural Capital Protocol you are working on, which impact drivers and dependencies you're interested in, your geographical scope and more. Please note that the list of filters on the left use the AND function.

Clear all filters Refine your search

Impact driversA measurable quantity of a natural resource that is used as an input to production or a measurable non-product output of business activity

  • E.g., decibels and duration of noise, lumens and duration of light etc. at site of impact.
  • E.g., wetlands, ponds, lakes, streams, rivers or peatland necessary to provide ecosystem services. Could measure of areas of infrastructure necessary for use, such as bridges, dams etc.
  • E.g., volume of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, HFCs, and PFCs, etc.
  • E.g., impact on species, ecosystems, habitats or genetic diversity.
  • E.g., area of aquaculture by type, area of seabed mining by type, etc.
  • E.g., volume of PM2.5, PM10, VOCs, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, etc.
  • E.g., volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild caught fish by species, number of wild-caught mammals by species, etc.
  • E.g., volume of waste matter discharges and retained in soil over a given period.
  • E.g., volume of waste by classification (hazardous, non-hazardous, radioactive…), by material constituents (lead, plastic…), or by disposal method (landfill, incineration, recycling…).
  • E.g., area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type, area of open cast mine by type, etc.
  • E.g., volume discharged to receiving water body of nutrients, (e.g. nitrates and phosphates) or other substances (e.g. heavy metals or chemicals).
  • E.g., the volume of groundwater consumed, the volume of surface water consumed, etc.

DependenciesA business reliance on or use of natural capital

  • A business dependence on biodiversity may materialize through some of the other dependencies above. Tick this box if you are interested in biodiversity specifically.
  • E.g., solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel.
  • E.g., nature based recreation, tourism.
  • E.g., information from nature (such as for bio-mimicry).
  • E.g., wood fiber, genetic resources, metals, minerals, plant and animal materials.
  • E.g., human or animal food.
  • E.g., crop pest control, pollination.
  • E.g., flood attenuation, water quality regulation.
  • E.g., waste assimilation, noise and dust regulation.
  • E.g., Fresh water (ground, surface or rain) or sea water.
  • E.g., employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions that support company staff or operations.

Geographical scope

Sectoral scope

Type of tool

Valuation type The process of estimating the relative importance, worth, or usefulness of natural capital to people or to a business, in a particular context

Organizational focus The part or parts of the business to be assessed e.g., the company as a whole, a business unit, or a product, project, process, site, or incident

  • Assessment of a corporation or group, including all subsidiaries, business units, divisions, different geographies or markets, etc.
  • Assessment of a planned undertaking or initiative for a specific purpose. NOTE thisincludes assessments of sites, activities, processes, and incidents.
  • Assessment of particular goods and/or services, including the materials and services used to produce these products

Value chain boundary The part or parts of the business value chain to be included in a natural capital assessment

  • or cradle-to-gate: covers the activities of suppliers, including purchased energy
  • or gate-to-gate: covers activities over which the business has direct operational control Including majority-owned subsidiaries.
  • or gate-to-grave: covers activities linked to the purchase, use, reuse, recovery, recycling, and final disposal of the business’ products and services

Intended user

Cost to access

Data needs

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Tool name Developer(s)
Impact drivers
Dependencies
Coastal Resilience Decision Support Tool Led by The Nature Conservancy, in partnership with many others - see overview below.

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

Coastal Resilience examines natures role in reducing coastal community risk, through four critical steps: 1) Assess risk and vulnerability; 2) Identify solutions; 3) Take action; 4) Measure effectiveness. The online mapping tool supports planners, government officials, and communities to develop risk reduction, restoration and resilience strategies. It includes a data-viewing platform and suite of web applications tailored to meet specific planning needs. The tool primarily identifies nature-based solutions but also supports disaster response, coastal habitat restoration and climate change policy. Partners: UN University, NOAA, USGS, Natural Capital Project, Association of State Floodplain Managers, University of California at Santa Cruz, University of Southern Mississippi, Esri and Alliance for Development Works, IFRC and the Global Disaster Preparedness Center

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
Common Guidance for the identification of High Conservation Values Production of the common guidance was led by Proforest on behalf of the HCV Resource Network

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry

The Common Guidance is a tool to help HCV practicioners and other interested parties implement the HCV approach in a consistent way across different natural resource sectors or geographies. The Common Guidance aims to widen the scope of use of HCV to other ecosystems and to provide guidance on the updated HCV definitions, as well as examples from practical field experience.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 05, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
Cool Farm Tool Cool Farm Alliance

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Water

The Cool Farm Tool enables farmers to measure the on-farm environmental efficiencies of their production systems. It reports environmental impacts of greenhouse gas emissions, water use efficiency and biodiversity score for the farm. The Cool Farm Tool is globally applicable, and has modules designed for arable and livestock (including dairy) systems.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 08

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Water
Corporate Environmental Profit and Loss account (EP&L) Kering with the support of PwC

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

The Environmental Profit & Loss account (EP&L) enables a company to evaluate its impacts on natural capital, by attributing a monetary value to the consequences on society from a company’s environmental impacts throughout its supply chain. The goal is to provide business with a tool to help fully understand the environmental impacts of their activities and subsequently take effective actions to decrease these impacts.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

Corporate Guidelines for the Economic Valuation of Ecosystem Services GVces - Center for Sustainability Studies of Getulio Vargas Foundation

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

This tool is a initiative of GVces - Center for Sustainability Studies of Getulio Vargas Foundation, in partnership with TEEB Regional Local, GIZ, Industry National Confederation of Brazil (CNI) and Brazilian Environmental Ministry (MMA). Those guidelines were created together with a group of 19 companies with the purpose of guiding the elaboration of simplified analyses of economic valuation of ecosystem services that are able to support strategic and tactical business decisions. Easy-to-apply, quick, and low-cost methods were privileged, in such a way to, if not completely, at least partially eliminate the need for support from third party consulting firms specialized in the topic.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 05, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
Corporate Natural Capital Accounts Natural Capital Committee, EFTEC, RSPB, PWC

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry

"This study develops a methodology for corporate natural capital accounting. The study is structured around three main phases of work: 1) Constructing a methodological framework for corporate natural capital accounting; 2) Developing pilot natural capital accounts; 3) Preparing 'generic' corporate natural capital framework and guidance. The framework establishes a system for measuring and valuing natural capital over time along with the explicit recognition of the funding that is required for its maintenance and enhancement."

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
Ecosystem Review for Impact Assessment World Resources Institute

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Water
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry

"The ESR for IA is a step-by-step method for projects to identify, assess and mitigate their impacts and dependencies on ecosystem services. It is promoted by IFC as a tool to meet PS6 (https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/a359a380498007e9a1b7f3336b93d75f/Updated_GN6-2012.pdf?MOD=AJPERES)"

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Water
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
ELD Initiative: Practitioner's Guide: Principles of economic valuation for sustainable land management based on the Massive Open Online Course „The Economics of Land Degradation“ ELD Initiative

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials

"This Practitioner’s Guide reaches out to provide practitioners and decision-makers with the skills necessary to make an economic case for preventing or reversing land degradation and to adopt more sustainable land management options. It is intended for individuals who engage in activities that ultimately determine land use and practices. This includes business owners, managers, students and teachers, activists, NGOs, farmers, engineers, politicians, journalists and other media workers, public service employees, and anyone else interested in learning about environmental valuation techniques with hands-on examples."

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials
ELD Initiative: User Guide - A 6+1 step approach to assess the economics of land management ELD Initiative

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials

The 6+1 step approach is the analysis method that has been adopted by the ELD Initiative to guide users through the process of establishing scientifically sound cost-benefit analyses to inform decision-making processes.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials
ELD Land Materiality Screening Tool CH2M and Sustain Value developed the tool for the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD) Initiative and the World Business Council for Sustainable Develo

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials

The ELD Land Materiality Screening Tool is a tool designed to enable companies to better assess the significance of land to their business. The objectives of the tool are to create awareness of the importance of land degradation and catalyze actions toward the implementation of sustainable land management projects. It was specifically designed to not require an intensive data collection effort to generate results. By answering a series of questions, the tool provides an estimate of the level of land impact and the level of business risk for a specific site where a company has an existing or potential interest. Based on the relationship between land impact and business risk, output is provided on options a company may take to minimize both. Users can compare the level of land impact and business risk between locations, enabling prioritization of action.

Applies to Step 04, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type

Dependencies

  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Materials