The filters below can help refine your search. You can use them to select which Step(s) of the Natural Capital Protocol you are working on, which impact drivers and dependencies you're interested in, your geographical scope and more. Please note that the list of filters on the left use the AND function.

Clear all filters Refine your search

Impact driversA measurable quantity of a natural resource that is used as an input to production or a measurable non-product output of business activity

  • E.g., the volume of groundwater consumed, the volume of surface water consumed, etc.
  • E.g., volume of waste by classification (hazardous, non-hazardous, radioactive…), by material constituents (lead, plastic…), or by disposal method (landfill, incineration, recycling…).
  • E.g., volume of waste matter discharges and retained in soil over a given period.
  • E.g., decibels and duration of noise, lumens and duration of light etc. at site of impact.
  • E.g., area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type, area of open cast mine by type, etc.
  • E.g., wetlands, ponds, lakes, streams, rivers or peatland necessary to provide ecosystem services. Could measure of areas of infrastructure necessary for use, such as bridges, dams etc.
  • E.g., area of aquaculture by type, area of seabed mining by type, etc.
  • E.g., volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild caught fish by species, number of wild-caught mammals by species, etc.
  • E.g., volume discharged to receiving water body of nutrients, (e.g. nitrates and phosphates) or other substances (e.g. heavy metals or chemicals).
  • E.g., volume of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, HFCs, and PFCs, etc.
  • E.g., volume of PM2.5, PM10, VOCs, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, etc.
  • E.g., impact on species, ecosystems, habitats or genetic diversity.

DependenciesA business reliance on or use of natural capital

  • E.g., solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biofuel, fossil fuel.
  • E.g., wood fiber, genetic resources, metals, minerals, plant and animal materials.
  • E.g., human or animal food.
  • E.g., Fresh water (ground, surface or rain) or sea water.
  • E.g., flood attenuation, water quality regulation.
  • E.g., employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions that support company staff or operations.
  • E.g., crop pest control, pollination.
  • E.g., waste assimilation, noise and dust regulation.
  • E.g., nature based recreation, tourism.
  • E.g., information from nature (such as for bio-mimicry).
  • A business dependence on biodiversity may materialize through some of the other dependencies above. Tick this box if you are interested in biodiversity specifically.

Geographical scope

Sectoral scope

Type of tool

Valuation type The process of estimating the relative importance, worth, or usefulness of natural capital to people or to a business, in a particular context

Organizational focus The part or parts of the business to be assessed e.g., the company as a whole, a business unit, or a product, project, process, site, or incident

  • Assessment of a corporation or group, including all subsidiaries, business units, divisions, different geographies or markets, etc.
  • Assessment of a planned undertaking or initiative for a specific purpose. NOTE thisincludes assessments of sites, activities, processes, and incidents.
  • Assessment of particular goods and/or services, including the materials and services used to produce these products

Value chain boundary The part or parts of the business value chain to be included in a natural capital assessment

  • or cradle-to-gate: covers the activities of suppliers, including purchased energy
  • or gate-to-gate: covers activities over which the business has direct operational control Including majority-owned subsidiaries.
  • or gate-to-grave: covers activities linked to the purchase, use, reuse, recovery, recycling, and final disposal of the business’ products and services

Intended user

Cost to access

Data needs

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57 Results sorting by
Tool name Developer(s)
Impact drivers
Dependencies
Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas World Resources Institute

Impact drivers

  • Water use

Dependencies

  • Water

The Aqueduct project provides open access, web-based global water risk mapping tools to help companies, investors, governments, and other users understand where and how water risks are emerging worldwide. The Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas is widely used by companies and investors to assess exposure to water-related business risks, now and in the future. Aqueduct is used by over 250 global companies reporting water risk to CDP, and Aqueduct data has been incorporated into industry initiatives such as Ceres' Investor Guide to Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Stress and the WBCSD Global Water Tool.

Applies to Step 05, 06, 07

Impact drivers

  • Water use

Dependencies

  • Water
Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) Basque Centre for Climate Change

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry

ARIES (ARtificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services) is a semantic, cloud-based ecosystem services modeling framework designed to advance ecosystem service assessment on several fronts. To improve conceptual detail and representation of ES dynamics, it adopts a uniform conceptualization of ES that gives equal emphasis to their production, flow and use by society, while keeping model complexity low enough to enable rapid and inexpensive assessment in many contexts and for multiple services. To improve fit to diverse application contexts, the methodology is assisted by model integration technologies that allow assembly of customized models from a growing model base. By using computer learning and reasoning, model structure may be specialized for each application context without requiring costly expertise. These features are designed to support more accurate decision making in diverse application contexts.

Applies to Step 05, 06

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
Biodiversity Footprint Tool Plansup, Wageningen Environmental Reserach, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL)

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity

This tool enables a business to measure its impact on biodiversity based on the two major pressure factors ‘Land use’ (type of management and number of hectares) and ‘Greenhouse gas emissions’ (in tons CO2). The impact of selected products is measured for the suppliers/raw materials and for the production process itself. The tool uses existing cause-effect relations from the GLOBIO3 biodiversity model and calculates the biodiversity footprint in [MSA.hectare], once you have entered the data. The MSA indicator is a proxy for biodiversity, expressing the extent to which the natural state of ecosystems is still intact. You can assess both the present biodiversity performance of the company (/product/sector), and an alternative or future performance. This allows you to measure the effectiveness of these measures. In a next version of the tool the pressure factors 'Water use' and 'Emissions (N and P) to water' will be included.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
Biodiversity Indicators for Monitoring Impacts and Conservation Actions BP, ChevronTexaco, Conservation International, Fauna & Flora International, IUCN, The Nature Conservancy, Shell, Smithsonian Institution, Statoil

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry

The Energy & Biodiversity Initiative's "Biodiversity Indicators for Monitoring Impacts and Conservation Actions" guide provides guidance for integrating biodiversity conservation into upstream oil and gas development. In particular this document outlines a methodology for developing site-level indicators to monitor significant positive and negative biodiversity impacts and company-level indicators to inform and report on the approach taken to biodiversity conservation at a strategic level. It is not the intention of this document to provide a prescriptive list of indicators to be used in every circumstance: the diverse nature of biodiversity and of oil and gas operations makes this an unrealistic expectation. Therefore, the emphasis is on the method of deriving indicators rather than the indicators themselves.

Applies to Step 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
Biodiversity Management Plan Guidance Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) within the WBCSD

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

The objective of this document is to provide practical guidance by presenting the key issues, explaining the connection between operations and healthy ecosystems, outlining some management approaches, and then linking to reference documents, data, tools and guidance so that companies can progressively implement biodiversity into site-level management through the development of an appropriately focused management plan. The Guidance applies primarily to quarries, but the principles can be applied to any mining site. The primary audience for this document is therefore environmental officers and operations managers. Throughout the Guidance, questions are posed to help the reader apply the recommendations directly to the management scenario. Where relevant, decision trees, checklists, case studies and templates are provided. The guidance document was developed following a process of consultation with a range of experts, both among CSI membership and external stakeholders.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09

Impact drivers

  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

BioScope Developed by PRé Consultants, Arcadis & CODE. Commissioned by Platform BEE; a collaboration between IUCN NL and VNO-NCW, financed by the Dutch min

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

Platform BEE's BioScope provides businesses with a simple and fast indication of the most important impacts on biodiversity arising from their supply chain. The results brought by BioScope are aimed at helping you to formulate meaningful actions to further assess and reduce the impact of your business on biodiversity. It not only indicates the potential impact of the commodity you purchase, but also of the upstream supply chain of these commodities. BioScope makes use of Exiobase v 2.2, enabling you to select commodities and resources purchased from 170 sectors in 43 countries, covering the largest part of global economic activities. The resulting impacts on biodiversity are calculated with the ReCiPe method, which includes the following impact drivers: Climate change, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, terrestrial ecotoxicity, marine ecotoxicity, freshwater ecotoxicity, agricultural land occupation, water scarcity.

Applies to Step 03, 04, 05

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

Business guide to natural capital valuation PwC

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

"The guide describes how to value the environmental impacts typically associated with business activities: air pollution, greenhouse gases, land use, solid waste, water consumption, and water pollution. Developed by PwC’s Total Impact Measurement and Management (TIMM) team the guide is based on PwC's extensive experience measuring and valuing natural capital. It is consistent with the Natural Capital Protocol recommendations for monetary valuation and ISO 14008. PwC was part of the core team that developed the Natural Capital Protocol. The guide itself and Kering’s pioneering Environmental Profit & Loss (EP&L) account (supported by PwC) were two of the four proprietary methodologies selected by the Coalition’s Methodological Review Panel to inform the development of the Protocol. PwC were also central to The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB), the WBCSD’s Guide to Corporate Ecosystem Valuation and the UK government’s Framework for Corporate Natural Capital Accounting."

Applies to Step 04, 05, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Soil pollutants
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Solid waste
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Non- GHG emissions
  • Impact on biodiversity

Dependencies

Business Guide to Water Valuation WBCSD + working group of companies

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions

This Business Guide to Water Valuation provides business-specific guidance on the main concepts and techniques associated with water valuation. The intention is to arm business managers with the knowledge and critical eye needed to work with valuation specialists. This will help managers commission, manage and review water valuation studies, as well as make the best use of the findings.

Applies to Step 01, 03, 04, 06, 07, 08

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
Co$tingNature (Costing Nature) King's College London (applications, data, models), AmbioTEK (software, data, models), UNEP-WCMC (applications, data)

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism

Co$ting Nature is a web based tool for natural capital accounting; it analyses the ecosystem services provided by natural environments, the beneficiaries of these services, and the impacts of human interventions. It tests the intended and unintended consequences of development actions on ecosystem service delivery in silico before they are tested in vivo, and calculates a current ecosystem service baseline. The Policy Support System (PSS) uses detailed spatial, global datasets at 1 km2 and 1 ha resolution, spatial biophysical and socioeconomic models, plus climate and land-use scenarios. We do not focus on valuing nature (how much someone is willing to pay) but rather costing it (understanding the resource e.g. land area and opportunity cost of nature being protected to produce the ecosystem services that we need and value). We provide input data for application of this model anywhere globally, or users can use this model with their own datasets.

Applies to Step 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • GHG emissions
  • Disturbances e.g. decibels and duration of noise/light
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Water
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
Coastal Capital Valuation Guidebook & Tools World Resources Institute in partnership with many organizations in the Caribbean and the United States

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity

This guidebook details the steps in conducting a coastal ecosystem valuation to inform decision making in the Caribbean. It guides valuation practitioners—both economists and non-economists—through the three phases of a valuation effort (scoping, analysis and outreach), with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement in all phases. Although designed using examples from coastal ecosystems in the Caribbean, it is also relevant to other ecosystems (e.g., terrestrial) and other world regions.

Applies to Step 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09

Impact drivers

  • Water use
  • Terrestrial ecosystem use e.g. area of agriculture by type, area of forest plantation by type
  • Water pollutants
  • Fresh water ecosystem use e.g. wetlands, ponds, rivers
  • Marine ecosystem use e.g. area of aquaculture by type
  • Impact on biodiversity
  • Other resource use e.g. volume of minerals extracted, volume of wild fish caught by species

Dependencies

  • Regulation of physical environment e.g. flood attenuation, water quality regulation
  • Experience e.g. nature-based recreation, tourism
  • Water
  • Regulation of biological environment e.g. pollination, crop pest control
  • Knowledge e.g. information from nature such as biomimicry
  • Nutrition e.g. human or animal food
  • Regulation of waste and emissions
  • Well-being and spiritual/ethical value e.g. employee satisfaction and stress release, sacred sites and indigenous traditions
  • Materials
  • Biodiversity